Dorothy’s Shoes Were Silver, Not Ruby Red. – OZ Facts

In the book, Dorothy is given “silver shoes with pointed toes.” The shading was changed for the 1939 motion picture featuring Judy Festoon in light of the fact that the movie producers felt that ruby red looked better in Technicolor.

  1. Oz wasn’t a fantasy, all things considered.

Different contrasts between the motion picture  expand—Dorothy makes a trip south to discover experiences. And keeping in mind that OZ Facts  ends up being a fantasy in the motion picture, it’s a genuine place in the book. At the point when Auntie Em asks Dorothy where she originated from, she says that she was in the Place that is known for OZ Facts at that point includes, “I’m so happy to be at home once more!” (“There’s no place like home” is a film line.)

  1. Baum collected the main duplicate of the book himself.

At the point when the primary Superb Wizard. of OZ Facts  fell order, composing on the original copy, “This ‘sham was produced using sheets I assembled quick up by hand. It is extremely the primary book at any point made of this story.”

  1. The book sold out in two weeks.

Full dispersion started in August. As per the distributer, the principal printing of 10,000 duplicates sold out in two weeks, trailed by a moment printing of 15,000 and a third printing of 10,000. In November, there was a fourth printing of 30,000 and in January, a fifth printing of 25,000. That is 90,000 books in the initial a half year. The Great Wizard.. of OZ Facts  remained a smash hit for a long time.

  1. Baum caught up with The Wizard. of Oz: The 1903 Melodic Event.

Alongside artist W.W. Denslow and writer Paul Tietjens, Baum set out to transform his book into a melodic. Fred Hamlin, maker of the Terrific Musical drama House in Chicago, is said to have gone up against the play in light of the fact that “Wizard” was in the title. Obviously his family made a fortune with the restorative tonic, Hamlin’s Wizard Oil. The Wizard. of Oz opened in June 1902 in Chicago. At that point it moved to Broadway, where it played for quite a long time.

Baum had a dropping out with his artist.

W.W. Denslow first worked with Baum outlining 1899’s Dad Goose: His Book, an unexpected smash hit. Denslow at that point represented The Superb Wizard of. OZ Facts  The men put stock in the pictures so much that when the distributer shied away on paying for shading print, Denslow and Baum paid for the plates themselves. In any case, as the two shared copyright for the book, they soon had a contradiction over who was in charge of its prosperity. OZ Facts  Pressures mounted amid the melodic, with Denslow demanding that as the outfit planner, he ought to be paid the same as the author and arranger. The two men never cooperated again. Baum continued composition continuations due to cash issues

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